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20121101
20121130
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
for a cease-fire. all day, a truce seemed to be negotiated by israeli bombardment by sea and air and hamas rockets. prospects seemed bleak until the sudden announcement. >> the united states welcomes the agreement today for a cease-fire in gaza. for it to hold, the rocket attacks must end, a broader calm returned. >> reporter: the gunfire in gaza turned to bursts of celebration. but in jerusalem, israel's leaders briefed the nation on the deal grim faced. a deal which seemed beyond reach this morning. the first bus bombing in israel since 2006, in the heart of tel aviv, across the street from the defense ministry. we found the bus cleaved open. and anger. this eyewitness told me he thought it was a rocket, saying that israel can't go on like this, that it must invade gaza. more than 20 wounded by what police say was an ied and the suspect, still at large. even with the cease-fire, the guns weren't silenced. as many as 20 rockets fired out of gaza, hours after the deal was inked. now, so far, israel has not responded. in the short-term, the cease-fire means that all sides including other fa
whoosh of outgoing rockets as hamas and other militant groups return fire. tonight, it seems this burst of violence is only getting worse. all day long, rockets filled the bright blue sky, gaza militants firing on israel. at least one rocket landed tonight in tel aviv, israel's commercial capital. sirens blared as residents hit the ground. three israelis were killed earlier when a rocket hit their apartment in the south. this as israeli warplanes pounded the gaza strip. its target? militant groups, most notably, hamas. but caught in the cross-fire, at least 12 civilians, including that 11-month-old boy. "what did my son do to die like this," his father cried. this is what the aftermath of one of these strikes looks like. a massive crater filled with cinderblock and rebar, the strong smell of diesel fuel, several of the houses around were damaged very badly. and the residents here on this street tell us they hope hamas and the other groups keep firing rockets into israel in retaliation. israel says this is a response to the almost 800 rockets that had landed in israel from gaza this year
poised to invade gaza. hamas daring them to make good on that threat. a region is on the brink of all-out war, and tonight world leaders are wondering what can be done to prevent it. our team has been out reporting from the field all day. abc's christiane amanpour is standing by in jerusalem tonight, and we begin with abc's alex marquardt in gaza. good evening, alex. >> reporter: good evening, george. as the death toll soared past 100 today, you could feel the anger growing. gazans are furious over the civilians deaths, but despite the loss of life, they're not backing down. a massive explosion as israeli air strikes pounded gaza today israel, and amidst it all, this, tiny bodies of the dead as they left the hospital today carried through the crowd for their funerals. "we ask all the militant groups to respond to these massacres," this man said. "we shouldn't talk about a ceasefire at all." they were killed sunday by a missile that obliterated their three-story house, killing nine from a single family. israel said it was an accident. in southern israel where our matt gutman is reporti
, and to the middle east now, that truce between israel and hamas holding. but now, a brewing crisis in egypt. giant protests because of their new leader and what he's done. president mohamed morsi, seen here with secretary of state hillary clinton, helping to broker that truce, but right after, a push from morsi for more power. many of the people of egypt said not so fast, and the protests are growing now. abc's matt gutman in the region again tonight for us. >> reporter: with massive protests, a cloud of tier gas, egypt is again in turmoil tonight. the violence, a reaction to egypt's first democratically elected leader, mohamed morsi, declaring all his presidential decisions are exempt from appeal or review by law makers or the courts. protesters torching a muslim brother office in alexandria and mohamed elle bar are detweeting, he appointed himself egypt's new f farrow. >> just months ago, morsi was obscure before being elected in may, shooting to international prominence this week by brokers the hamas/israel cease-fire. solidifying himself as a key u.s. al li. >> i want to thank president morsi
israel killed the military leader of the palestinian militant group hamas, in an air strike. look. this is the car in gaza, carrying the hamas commander as an israeli rocket hits it. israel said this was retaliation for rockets fired by palestinian militants. overall, israel hitting 20 targets. it's being called the most serious escalation in violence there in four years. >>> and back here at home, a very big drama today, about the meningitis outbreak. the man who owns that drug factory, contaminated by fungus, came to be grilled on capitol hill. and in the same room, the families of those who died, giving gripping testimony, saying, it is a nightmare that will not end. here's abc's david kerley. >> reporter: the man whose company produced drugs that sickened and killed so many -- >> anything you can say to them? >> reporter: ran a gauntlet of reporters. >> why not? >> reporter: he said nothing about his pharmacy that made drugs for debilitating back pain. the conditions were deplorable. dirty floors, clean rooms with mold or bacterial growth. the steroids produced here infected e
. and what happened was that hamas let go a rocket in this direction. you don't get a sense of general panic neither here nor in tel aviv. but people are concerned. they obviously don't want to be on the receiving end of any of these rockets. i think also one has to say that people are beginning to dig in for perhaps a long war. a long operation. >> so, give us a big picture sense of where it's heading. are we closer to the brink of the escalation tonight or has it pulled back any at all? >> reporter: i don't think it's pulled back any at all. they've already started closing roads around gaza. and everybody wants to know, what does that mean? people expect that there will be some kind of ground operation, but nobody knows quite when. and it looks like it could start the sort of escalation that could, as they say, be a war of attrition. sort of israel trying with all its might to stop these missiles. to go after the launching sites, to go after the operatives, but it's difficult. >> but it sounds as if you're saying to me that the next 24 to 48 hours are absolutely critical in which direction
more than a long-term cease-fire. hamas is demanding they loosen its grip on its borders and for it to stop assassinating its leaders. george, both sides are dug in. >> so there's still much to work through. all right, thanks, matt. let's go to alex marquardt in gaza. alex, there was some hope a cease-fire might be taking hold but that bombing has not stopped all day where you are. >> reporter: no, it really hasn't, george. it's been very strange to hear about peace talks and cease-fires when really the explosions have not stopped. for much of the night there has been incoming artillery and air strikes from the sky have not stopped, and a short while ago we saw militants firing rockets from here just behind us, and that has been going on for much of the day. gazans say what they want, of course, is is peace and quiet but what's been happening for the last week is gazans defending themself and they see the u.s. completely siding with israel. so while they would like to see a cease-fire, they say true peace cannot come along until israel stops targeting people in the gaza s
, where that truce between israel and hamas is holding. and this evening, a closer look at israel's iron dome. that some now believe saved lives on both sides of this conflict. abc's matt gutman is in the region again tonight. >> reporter: in gaza, they began scraping away the damage. a massive cleanup, coupled with jubilation. in israel, reservists began packing up and heading home. and streets deserted, all week long, are coming back to life. the rockets and the sirens that sent 3-year-old karin scampering to safety here now quiet. for eight days, three generations of this family huddled in their bomb shelter. afraid to step outside. tonight, karin smiling again. and her grandmother, jillian, able to take a walk. what is it like to be able to walk out on the street again for the first time in more than a week? >> it's wonderful. but we're not terribly hopeful. >> reporter: they still expect the days ahead to bring more rockets, but they say they feel more protected than before. >> now with the iron dome, really, you know, probably the chances of getting hit are smaller than the chance
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)